11th Grade

World Languages

At Moses Brown, juniors are learning to use their growing fluency in another language and deepening their sophistication of grammar and vocabulary to emulate that of native speakers.  Mastery of a foreign language is critical to understanding one’s native culture and worldview, and those of others.  Of course, it also opens a myriad of travel opportunities and ways of connecting with other people and cultures.

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Curriculum

  • Chinese

    Chinese

    Chinese students in Mandarin 3 are comfortable ordering a meal in a restaurant, asking for directions, and navigating most common social situations.  They are gaining mastery over more complicated grammar constructions that aren’t intuitive for English speakers, reading more complex passages in Chinese, and developing comfort with long-form writing.

    They learn a growing body of Chinese characters at a faster pace, and deepen their knowledge of Chinese history and culture.

  • Latin

    Latin

    Latin students study Vergil’s Aeneid and Caesar’s Gallic Wars, following the College Board’s syllabus for the Advanced Placement course.  They master and employ a vast amount of vocabulary, translate poetry, display their command of dactylic hexameter, and study Caesar’s invasions of Britian and Gaul (France).  In this challenging but highly rewarding course, students move beyond simply learning the language to appreciating what is going on behind the language, including the military propaganda used by Caesar and its parallels to the modern era. Students are required to memorize a passage of Vergil, notate its scansion, and recite their lines. Students be able to translate their lines, explain the underlying grammar, and explicate its mythological references and their significance.

  • French

    French

    French students clearly describe events from the past, in the present, and in the future, and display a general knowledge of 8-14th century French history through film projects and in-class reenactments.  They read French fiction and watch French films with confidence and understanding.

    In addition to mastering more sophisticated grammar (including the subjunctive mood), students learn the major cities, cultural sites, and historical figures of the francophone world.  They dream up their ideal city and present a detailed map for it to their classmates, using only French to describe the civic challenges they tackled and the solutions they devised to those problems.

  • Spanish

    Spanish

    Spanish 4 students study modern life in the Spanish-speaking world, visions for the future, Hispanic art, and the differences between rural and urban life in Spanish-speaking countries.  As students turn their attention to college applications, they compare the systems of higher education in the U.S. and Spain.

    Students also conduct a political campaign for student senate president, writing speeches, designing campaign posters, and creating a video to help their candidacy (whether or not they choose to run).

    Honors students also read and watch a significant amount of Spanish language content: novels, short stories, plays, television shows, movies, and newspaper articles.  They display what they’ve learned in written essays, presentations, and short movies.

    Advanced students build a foundation for success with the AP curriculum, and should actively take advantage of every opportunity to communicate in Spanish, finding joy in the process of gaining fluency.  The most successful students cultivate a passion for the culture and history of Spanish-speaking countries, and think in Spanish, rather than simply translating their thoughts.

    Each student teaches a full class on the topic of their choosing, entirely in Spanish.  This demanding and exhilarating experience requires students to prepare thoroughly and be able to think on their feet.

    Echoing themes in English and History classes, juniors study the Spanish Civil War, reading Federico García Lorca’s La Casa de Bernarda Alba, exploring the issues at the heart of this devastating conflict.

Language Exchange

Immersive Chinese learning exchange

Eight students and three educators from Changle Middle School in the Shandong Province of China visited MB for a learning exchange.

Language, Food, and Culture

Learning the art of bao making

Upper school Mandarin students took a field trip to Tom’s BaoBao in downtown Providence to learn about the history of bao, a delicious Chinese street food, and try their hand at making it.

Faculty

Lisa Ardente

Upper School World Language

About

Lisa Ardente

Wellesley College – B.A.
New England School of Law – J.D.

David Flaxman

Upper School World Language and Sophomore Dean

About

David Flaxman

University of Pennsylvania – B.A.
Columbia University – M.A.

Chandra Harris

Upper School World Language

About

Chandra Harris

Stanford University – B.A.
Brown University – M.A.
Brown University – Ph.D.

Elena Peterson

Upper School World Language

About

Elena Peterson

Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio – B.A.
University of Rhode Island – M.A.

Jerrett Wilson

Upper School World Language

About

Jerrett Wilson

North Carolina State University – B.A.
Middlebury College – M.A.

Erin Chechik

Upper School World Language

About

Erin Chechik

Washington University – B.A.
Boston University – M.A., M.A.

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